DPC JOURNAL | Top Stories, DPC Perspectives & Latest Interviews

EP 297 | Age Management Medicine with Director of Clinical Relations at Cenegenics®

Cenegenics® created the field of Age Management Medicine in 1997 and is regarded as the Gold Standard in the medical community. “No one wants to sit around waiting to feel old. Even worse is the fear of diseases that seem to be common as you age…obesity, fatigue, heart disease, diabetes, dementia, and cancer.” ~ Physician Dr. McCallen

By Michael Tetreault, Editor-in-Chief, Concierge Medicine Today/The DPC Journal and Host of The DocPreneur Leadership Podcast

In today’s DocPreneur Leadership Podcast we dive into Age Management Medicine with the Director of Clinical Relations and Corporate Development at Cenegenics, Rudy Inaba. In 1997, Cenegenics® pioneered Age Management Medicine and has since been regarded as the Premier Standard in the medical community. Cenegenics® is the undisputed clinical leader in the field of health optimization medicine. Their physicians go beyond disease-based medicine and focus on preventive medicine. These Physicians help their Patients get to the root causes of underlying health issues, helping you to feel and look your best at every age. In fact, based on an internal study of the last 200 Cenegenics® patients completing their first annual re-evaluation, the average body fat percentage declined 30% from the initial evaluation when joining the Cenegenics® program*[1].

Each Cenegenics® physician has completed the Clinical Strategies for Healthy Aging in Age Management Medicine program, sponsored by the Foundation of Healthy Aging, the educational division of Cenegenics® Education and Research Foundation (CERF) – providing our physicians with a specialized skillset to practice this medical specialty.

Patients who commit to the program experience dramatic changes in their health and vitality; decreasing body fat and increasing muscle tone, improving insulin and cholesterol levels, increasing physical and sexual vitality, managing stress and improving mental sharpness and sleep quality. Cenegenics® doesn’t subscribe to traditional medicine’s fix-it-when-it’s broken and diagnose-and-treat philosophies. Instead, we offer proactive, preventive medical care, enhancing health rather than waiting for age-related diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes to appear.

Rudy Inaba, Director of Clinical Relations & Corporate Development at Cenegenics Elite Health

Meet Rudy Inaba, Director of Clinical Relations and Corporate Development at Cenegenics®

Rudy Inaba is a recognized speaker, educator and expert in the age management, concierge medical, health and wellness industry with more than 15 years of direct experience in providing elite-level clinical service. Rudy is well-versed and passionate professional in the following areas:

-Age management medicine
-Exercise testing, analysis and diagnostics
-Lifestyle management
-Fitness program development
-Athlete sport performance
-Nutraceutical and supplement formulation

Questions we discuss in today’s interview include:

  1. Can you give a little history on Cenegenics? When was Cenegenics founded? What the premise of the program is?
  2. How is Cenegenics different than traditional medicine?
  3. What problems/symptoms do patients typically come to Cenegenics about?
  4. With Cenegenics patient programs, what kind of components do you provide to optimize their health?
  5. What kind of results can Concierge physicians expect with their patients on the Cenegenics program?
  6. What can concierge medicine practitioners gain by incorporating Cenegenics into their existing practices? Do they have to give up their current practice to work with Cenegenics?

Contact

Office: 702.953.1536
Email: rinaba@cenegenics.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rudy-inaba-7a992080/

Resources Mentioned In This Podcast

Citations

  1. [1] From Vulnerable Plaque to Vulnerable Patient—Part III: Executive Summary of the Screening for Heart Attack Prevention and Education (SHAPE) Task Force Report, The American Journal of Cardiology, 2006.

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